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BQ Row 2

Row 2  –  1

P1010050Bee Hive

signed:   Emma E. JonesFreeman, Emma

Age: 34

Bees mimic human social order – a cooperative, productive social hierarchy.  Two overlapped triangles are found in use by a number of faiths and cultures. Not to be confused with the Star of David.   Both bees and the hexogram were early symbols of friendship.

Emma E. Jones was born on November 24, 1839 in Thorold, Ontario, one of at least two children of William Jones and Anna Tamplin. She was the first of her family to join the Community on December 31, 1857.  Emma bore a Community child by Roswell B. Hawley: Herbert Jones Hawley (Freeman) b. Oct 1,1873. She married at the breakup John S. Freeman who adopted Herbert.  She and John Freeman also had a child:  Shirley Robert Freeman b. February 11, 1884.Emma Jones worked in the silk factory and as a superintendent in the Community. She died at the age of 91 on June 3, 1931 at Oneida and is buried in the Community Cemetery.

Row 2  –  2

P1010061Type Case

signed:  Libbie MalloryMallory, Elizabeth

Age: 27

Elizabeth Mallory was born on February 10, 1846 in Michigan, the oldest daughter of Gibson and Sarah Mallory. The family moved to New York State after she was born, and joined the Community on December 18, 1849.  She seceded with her parents in 1854 at the age of 8, but returned on May 9, 1859, when she was 13. Elizabeth had two Community children with Alfred Hawley whom she married at the breakup on September 2, 1879 in Verona:  Ralph E. Hawley b March 9, 1876 Arline Hawley (Jasper) b May 16, 1879.  After they were married they moved to California and had two more children:

Joseph R. Hawley b Dec 25, 1880 and died at age of 17 months Otto Hawley b Nov 9, 1883.  She worked as a silk-spooler in the Community. Died in California April 21 , 1931.

Row   2  –  3

P1010010 Musical Design

signed:   LilyBailey, Lilly Dale

Age: 16

Lily Dale Bailey was born, the 17th Community child, on May 11,1857 to John Hutchins and Jane C. Bailey. Ann Hobart “Sophie” Skinner was her half sister.  She was raised in the Community and had an excellent singing voice.

She was a member of Helen C. Noyes’ “Singing girls”. Lily had a sense of humor and was very much an individualist. Hope Allen thought “she would never of herself have joined the Community – and was certainly not a natural Communist – yet her Community inheritance strengthened her in her refusal to dramatize suffering and death”.

Lily first married John H. Cragin at the breakup on Jan 1, 1880. They had two children:  John Hobart Cragin, Jr. b Oct 8, 1885 Carlotta Annette Cragin (Kinsley) b May 27, 1888

Her husband, John Cragin, died in 1899 and she married Manly Aiken about 1906. Thereafter, she insisted her last name was Cragin-Aiken. She and her new husband ran the Post Office in Kenwood. Lily died of a carcinoma of the kidney on Sept 2, 1926, at the age of 69 and is buried in the Community Cemetery.

Row  2  –  4

P1010035Silk Skeining

signed:   Laura B. SmithSmith, Laura Burgess

Age: 57

Laura Burgess was born on September 10, 1816, in Fairport, NY. She experienced religion in 1813 at 15 years of age and joined the Methodist Church in 1834. She embraced holiness by reading Perfectionist literature in 1850.

Laura married Giles Smith about 1829 and they had 3 children. Her husband died in 1848 and she moved for a time to a group in Michigan. She was accepted in the Oneida Association on a probationary basis after travelling from Michigan via the Erie Canal. (She may at one time, have joined the Shakers). She joined the Community a widow with two sons on September 15, 1851: Francis Smith b Sept 18, 1841 (he legally changed his name to Wayland-Smith) and Charles Homer Smith b. April 26, 1845. A daughter had died before they joined.

Laura was a teacher, a tailoress, and in general services in the Community. She may have left for a period of 7-9 years with her son Homer, but returned and remained in the Community after October of 1872.She died at the age of 71, on August 17, 1888 and is buried in the Community Cemetery.

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